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irecyclart:

I took an old guitar that i couldn’t save, removed the back and made shelves from the left material, and the inner structural wood of the guitar. The only two materials are one guitar and carpenter’s glue, that’s it! (via The last acord of the spices guitar)

Pluck a new chord with this busted guitar by having it pen a few new tunes as a spice rack.

irecyclart:

I took an old guitar that i couldn’t save, removed the back and made shelves from the left material, and the inner structural wood of the guitar. The only two materials are one guitar and carpenter’s glue, that’s it! (via The last acord of the spices guitar)

Pluck a new chord with this busted guitar by having it pen a few new tunes as a spice rack.

(via recycledhomes)

We all love the conveniences provided by our fancy smartphones, but it’s easy to forget that these devices aren’t inherently the greenest products on the market. Thankfully, engaging companies like Verizon have set up programs where people can recycle their electronics with ease and with the betterment of others in mind.
According to its “Electronic Device Recycling" program page: 
“Recycle your used devices with Verizon and you may be eligible to receive a Verizon Wireless gift card. We accept cell phones, tablets, netbooks and mobile hotspot devices from any carrier. For every device recycled, we will also make a $1 contribution to HopeLine® from Verizon.”
The best parts of this program are pretty great:
Verizon will take products from any other carrier
Victims and survivors of domestic violence will receive some much-needed assistance and support.


"More than a million pounds of e-waste have been collected at Verizon Recycling Rallies," which means that plenty of junk has been kept out of landfills and the appropriately re-used and recycled.
Even if you’re not a Verizon customer, this is a fairly excellent program that looks to benefit all the people, plants, and animals that live on our lovely planet. And be on the lookout for similar programs from your city, phone provider, and/or favorite retail outlets. We use lots of electronics in the 21st century, so it’s important that we understand the environmental impact of the technology we love.
This post does not reflect an endorsement of Verizon as a phone provider or retailer. It merely seeks to highlight a worthy program that looks to help reduce the waste and environmental impact of electronic devices, while spreading awareness for the environment.

We all love the conveniences provided by our fancy smartphones, but it’s easy to forget that these devices aren’t inherently the greenest products on the market. Thankfully, engaging companies like Verizon have set up programs where people can recycle their electronics with ease and with the betterment of others in mind.

According to its “Electronic Device Recycling" program page: 

Recycle your used devices with Verizon and you may be eligible to receive a Verizon Wireless gift card. We accept cell phones, tablets, netbooks and mobile hotspot devices from any carrier. For every device recycled, we will also make a $1 contribution to HopeLine® from Verizon.”

The best parts of this program are pretty great:

  1. Verizon will take products from any other carrier
  2. Victims and survivors of domestic violence will receive some much-needed assistance and support.

"More than a million pounds of e-waste have been collected at Verizon Recycling Rallies," which means that plenty of junk has been kept out of landfills and the appropriately re-used and recycled.

Even if you’re not a Verizon customer, this is a fairly excellent program that looks to benefit all the people, plants, and animals that live on our lovely planet. And be on the lookout for similar programs from your city, phone provider, and/or favorite retail outlets. We use lots of electronics in the 21st century, so it’s important that we understand the environmental impact of the technology we love.

This post does not reflect an endorsement of Verizon as a phone provider or retailer. It merely seeks to highlight a worthy program that looks to help reduce the waste and environmental impact of electronic devices, while spreading awareness for the environment.

redesignrevolution:

(via Upcycle This! 8 Ways to Embrace Eco-Couture (NY Fashion Week Edition))

In honor of New York Fashion Week, here are 8 creative ideas for upcycling a variety of materials to create inventive dresses and accessories. I personally like the clutch made from candy wrappers, the hobo bag made from computer keys, and the storybook gown made fromGolde Books.
What are your thoughts on the “eco-couture?”

redesignrevolution:

(via Upcycle This! 8 Ways to Embrace Eco-Couture (NY Fashion Week Edition))

In honor of New York Fashion Week, here are 8 creative ideas for upcycling a variety of materials to create inventive dresses and accessories. I personally like the clutch made from candy wrappers, the hobo bag made from computer keys, and the storybook gown made fromGolde Books.

What are your thoughts on the “eco-couture?”

mothernaturenetwork:

30 things you should never compost or recycleThough recycling and composting are two of the most important green practices, there are some items that are bad for the environment. Follow these guidelines for best practices.

While some folks might quibble with certain of the “do not compost” items, this list does represent a good guide regarding certain items that you shouldn’t try to compost and/or recycle. Most of these qualifications concern how a given product is made or processed. In general, we recommend that you do your own research into the restrictions in your area before you decide what you should and should not send to the compost pile or recycling bin.

mothernaturenetwork:

30 things you should never compost or recycle
Though recycling and composting are two of the most important green practices, there are some items that are bad for the environment. Follow these guidelines for best practices.

While some folks might quibble with certain of the “do not compost” items, this list does represent a good guide regarding certain items that you shouldn’t try to compost and/or recycle. Most of these qualifications concern how a given product is made or processed. In general, we recommend that you do your own research into the restrictions in your area before you decide what you should and should not send to the compost pile or recycling bin.

Check out the answers to these Top 10 Recycling FAQs. Pay special attention to #6:

Q: “I’m buying a soda. Bottle or can?”

A: “Can, definitely. Most cans contain 50% or more recycled aluminum. And a used aluminum can is recycled and back on the grocery shelf as a new can in as little as 60 days.”

#10 is a good one as well:

Q: “So what can’t I recycle?”

A: “Aerosol cans (you aren’t still using those, right?), ceramics, diapers (as if), household glass like window panes and mirrors, light bulbs and CFLs (because of the mercury), and tires. Oh, and hazardous waste, of course.”

For those of interested in parsing the causes and effects of our products and how we use them daily and in the long term, I really like this explanation of recycling v. upcycling - especially the benefits and efficiency of both processes.

(via upcyclingit)